Cryptic Nights: Kin @ CCA

www.cryptic.org.uk

Combining surround sound, moving image and projection, Watchtower takes the symbol of a lighthouse to explore the shifting gaze of modern-day surveillance. Using ocean rhythms to symbolise this ever-present unpredictability and light as a tool of control, Kin highlights efforts to manipulate our behaviour and encourage conformity.

KIN:

“I’m really excited to be sharing Watchtower at Cryptic Nights. The scope of online surveillance and the misuse of our data has certainly become more frequently reported in the mainstream press since I first developed the installation two years ago.” says Glasgow-based artist Kin. “There’s a deepening awareness of how Facebook, Amazon, Google and the like are using our participation in social media and communication networks, and increasing conversations around our ability to push back against actions that infringe on privacy. Taking the shape of a lighthouse projecting a beam of footage collected by a drone, Watchtower looks at how safety and the avoidance of risk are common justifications for increasing surveillance..”

Listings Info

Watchtower & Origins

Thu 7 March // 20.00 // £10/£7

Box office: 0141 352 4900 / cca-glasgow.com

watchtower-installation-small-for-twitter

Kin is a Glasgow-based artist combining sound, moving image and physical structures to create multi-sensory installations often incorporating technology and digital tools (motion sensors, software, tracking devices, drones) to examine understandings of nature, agency, and how environments mediate relationships between people. A current area of interest is using imagery and metaphor from the natural environment to explore power within digital landscapes and the relationship between communication and surveillance technologies.

She has produced works for DNweekeND, Doncaster; Chorlton Arts Festival, Greater Manchester; Sound UK, rural touring in Wiltshire, Devon and Cornwall; Reuse Aloud, New Bridge Project, Newcastle; InTransit Festival, Kensington and Chelsea, London), the Poor Door at A-Side B-Side Gallery, London and Coastival, Scarborough. In 2016, her cardboard and electronic work Dead Pigeons and Chandeliers featured in a New York gallery exhibit on Politics and Power, and in May 2017, she received the first international showcase of her audiovisual installation Watchtower at the European Convention Centre in Luxembourg, initially developed whilst Artist-in-Residence at The Auxiliary, Stockton. Watchtower was developed at Cove Park during a Cryptic Residency 2018.

What is it about your work that you feel fits with the ethos of the Cryptic Nights?

I think Watchtower was programmed for Cryptic Nights because it’s an immersive experience that brings together moving image, sound and installation. Although I first created the piece in 2017, Cryptic supported me to further develop the work with a residency at Cove Park. This enabled me to take the work in a new direction, learn new skills, try it with surround sound for the first time, and incorporate new elements. This development was all about taking risks, experimenting and pushing my practice to the next level – I think that’s what Cryptic Nights is all about.

Do you find yourself working between genres often – Cryptic seems to aim somewhere between art, music and performance?

I have a very multi-disciplinary approach to my work. I don’t have a set medium that I work with each time, the materials that I use just depend on the idea and what I want to communicate, so previously I’ve used video, projections, light, sound, music, electronics, sculpture, installation, found and recycled objects, painting and collage. My approach is much more concept-led. Cryptic doesn’t pigeonhole me into any of these areas which is really refreshing. I actually trained as a musician and studied music at university – when people find that out, they often want to put me within the ‘music category’ but my work doesn’t sit neatly within that. It’s much more at the intersection of music, sound art, visual art and sometimes crosses into dance and movement.

What attracted you to work with Cryptic?

Even before I’d moved to Scotland, I knew Cryptic for their relentless pursuit of innovation in sound art. They shared my vision that ‘nature’ and ‘technology’ aren’t two opposing constructs, and that there could be this fluid exploration that used the tools of technology to create understandings of the environment. I often use metaphors and imagery from oceans, forests, weather, flora and fauna to create socio-political perspectives on the digital landscape, creating an experience that similarly sees online and offline spaces as intertwined. And Cryptic are very much on this wavelength.

How well does this piece fit with other work that you have made?

Watchtower fits within a body of work that looks at the relationship between online surveillance, social media and digital communications. But it also fits more broadly in terms of my ongoing interest in combining aesthetics commonly associated with ‘nature’ and ‘technology’ to create a more complex, more intertwined reading.

And… do you have a particular approach to developing your work?

I’m always coming up with new ideas, I have a never-ending list of things that I could explore, but the ideas that I decide to seriously pursue have to be things that I feel are important. So my process is often coming up with a tonne of different angles and then whittling it down to the thing that I think is going to work best. I read a lot – I find endless inspiration in the critical theory of the mid-20th Century, and more recent journals on neuroscience, psychology, media theory – and I always have too many tabs open on my browser. That’s like a visualisation of my thinking process. I never start with a blank page. Then when I do start actually producing the work, it’ll change along the way. I often go through a stage of not liking it, having huge self-doubt and wanting to chuck everything out of the window, but I can usually come round to some kind of reconciliation!

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Recognising the need for a regular, supportive platform for emerging Scottish based artists with fresh ideas, Cryptic launched Cryptic Nights in 2009 and have to date, presented over 270 artists in partnership with the Centre for Contemporary Arts (CCA) in Glasgow.

 

Crossing creative boundaries with live music, visual and sonic art, film and new media, Cryptic Nights presents a selection of the highest quality emerging talent to inspire, invigorate and excite audiences across the UK.

Cryptic

Cryptic is a Glasgow based internationally-renowned producing art house, presenting today’s most imaginative, innovative artists whilst also nurturing the creative talent of tomorrow. We create memorable experiences that engage and inspire our audiences, ‘ravishing the senses’ with multi-media performances that fuse music, sonic and visual art.

 

Founded by Cathie Boyd in 1994, the company thrives on artistic innovation and creative risk-taking, which has subsequently created an environment where artists have been encouraged to push artistic boundaries.

 

To date, Cryptic has presented 172 productions (including 42 world premieres), which have been seen in 29 countries.

 

In 2019, Cryptic celebrates 25 years of ‘ravishing the senses.’

 

.

Recognising the need for a regular, supportive platform for emerging Scottish based artists with fresh ideas, Cryptic launched Cryptic Nights in 2009 and have to date, presented over 270 artists in partnership with the Centre for Contemporary Arts (CCA) in Glasgow.

 

Crossing creative boundaries with live music, visual and sonic art, film and new media, Cryptic Nights presents a selection of the highest quality emerging talent to inspire, invigorate and excite audiences across the UK.

Cryptic

Cryptic is a Glasgow based internationally-renowned producing art house, presenting today’s most imaginative, innovative artists whilst also nurturing the creative talent of tomorrow. We create memorable experiences that engage and inspire our audiences, ‘ravishing the senses’ with multi-media performances that fuse music, sonic and visual art.

 

Founded by Cathie Boyd in 1994, the company thrives on artistic innovation and creative risk-taking, which has subsequently created an environment where artists have been encouraged to push artistic boundaries.

 

To date, Cryptic has presented 172 productions (including 42 world premieres), which have been seen in 29 countries.

 

In 2019, Cryptic celebrates 25 years of ‘ravishing the senses.’

 

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